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Saturday, August 5, 2017

Saint Tassach (Tassac) 1st Bishop of Raholp, Ireland (+495) - January 14 & April 14



Saint Tassach (Tassac)

1st Bishop of Raholp, Ireland (+495)

January 14 & April 14

Saint Tassach, also known as St. Tassac was an Irish saint, born in the first decade of the 5th century, died c. 497.

He was one of Saint Patrick's disciples, and when St Patrick founded the Church of Raholp he placed St Tassach in charge of it. The Church of Raholp was situated approximately 1 mile south of Saul.

St Tassach was a skilled artisan who made crosiers, patens, chalices, credences, shrines, and crosses for many of the churches founded by St Patrick, but is remembered primarily for the fact that he was selected by St Patrick to be with him in his last moments and to administer the Holy Viaticum to him.

This event is chronicled in "The Martyrology of Donegall":

"Tassach of Raholp gave the Body of Christ to Saint Patrick before his death in the monastery of Saul".

Sources:

WIKIPEDIA

&

http://gkiouzelis.blogspot.com

ORTHODOX HEART

Friday, August 4, 2017

Saint Euthymios the Great (+473) - January 20


EASTERN ORTHODOX CHURCH



Saint Euthymios the Great (+473)

January 20

Saint Euthymius the Great came from the city of Melitene in Armenia, near the River Euphrates. His parents, Paul and Dionysia, were pious Christians of noble birth. After many years of marriage they remained childless, and in their sorrow they entreated God to give them offspring. Finally, they had a vision and heard a voice saying, “Be of good cheer! God will grant you a son, who will bring joy to the churches.” The child was named Euthymius (“good cheer”).

Saint Euthymius’ father died soon after this, and his mother, fulfilling her vow to dedicate her son to God, gave him to her brother, the priest Eudoxius, to be educated. He presented the chid to Bishop Eutroius of Melitene, who accepted him with love. Seeing his good conduct, the bishop soon made him a Reader.

Saint Euthymius later became a monk and was ordained to the holy priesthood. At the same time, he was entrusted with the supervision of all the city monasteries. Saint Euthymius often visited the monastery of Saint Polyeuctus, and during Great Lent he withdrew into the wilderness. His responsibility for the monasteries weighed heavily upon the ascetic, and conflicted with his desire for

Saint Bathildis, Queen of France & Nun of Chelles in France, from England (+680) - January 30




Saint Bathildis,

Queen of France & Nun of Chelles in France, from England (+680)

January 30

Saint Balthild of Ascania (Old English: Bealdhild, ‘bold sword’ or ‘bold spear; around 626 – January 30, 680), also called Bathilda, Baudour, or Bauthieult, was the wife and queen of Clovis II, the king of Burgundy and Neustria (639–658).

Saint Balthild was sold into slavery as a young girl and served in the household of Erchinoald, the mayor of the palace of Neustria to Clovis.

Saint Balthild was born circa 626–627. She was beautiful, intelligent, modest and attentive to the needs of others. Erchinoald, whose wife had died, was attracted to Balthild and wanted to marry her, but she did not want to marry him. She hid herself away and waited until Erchinoald had remarried. Later, possibly because of Erchinoald, Clovis noticed her and asked for her hand in marriage.

Even as queen, Saint Balthild remained humble and modest. She is famous for her charitable service and generous donations. From her donations, the abbeys of Corbie and Chelles were founded: it is likely that others such as Jumièges, Jouarre and Luxeuil were also founded by the queen. She provided support for Saint Claudius of Besançon and his abbey in the Jura Mountains.

Saint Balthild bore Clovis three children, all of whom became kings: Clotaire, Childeric and Theuderic.

When Clovis died (between 655 and 658), his eldest son Clotaire succeeded to the throne, aged five. His mother St Balthild acted as the queen regent. As queen, she was a capable stateswoman. She abolished the practice of trading Christian slaves and strove to free children who had been sold into slavery. This claim is corroborated by Jane Tibbetts Schulenburg, who mentions that St Balthild and Saint Eloi (who was also known as Eligius, according to Dado) “worked together on their favorite charity, the buying and freeing of slaves”. After her three sons reached adulthood and had become established in their respective territories (Clotaire in Neustria, Childeric in Austrasia, and Theuderic in Burgundy), St Balthild withdrew to her favourite Abbey of Chelles near Paris.

Saint Balthild died on January 30, 680, and was buried at the Abbey of Chelles, east of Paris. Saint Balthild was canonised by Pope Nicholas I, around 200 years after her death.

Source:

Wikipedia

Saint Elian (Eilian / Llanelian), missionary in Cornwall, England & hermit in Llanelian, Wales, from Rome (+6th century) - January 12 & 13


GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART



Saint Elian (Eilian / Llanelian),

missionary in Cornwall, England & hermit in Llanelian, Wales,

from Rome (+6th century)

January 12 & 13

Saint Elian was founded a church in North Wales around the year 450. The Parish of Llanelian is named after him. The Legend of St. Elian says he was related to Saint Ismael Bishop of Rhos in Wales and labored in the missions of Cornwall, England. His feast day is 13 January.

Tradition holds that he came by sea from Rome and landed in Anglesey at Porth yr Yehen, where he built his church.

Saint Elian forbade the keeping of greyhounds after one killed or disturbed a doe in his care.

Source: Wikipedia

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Saint Malachi the Prophet (+400 BC) - January 3



Saint Malachi the Prophet (+400 BC)

January 3

The Holy Prophet Malachi lived 400 years before the Birth of Christ, at the time of the return of the Jews from the Babylonian Captivity. Malachi was the last of the Old Testament prophets, therefore the holy Fathers call him “the seal of the prophets.”

Manifesting himself an image of spiritual goodness and piety, he astounded the nation and was called Malachi, i.e., an angel. His prophetic book is included in the Canon of the Old Testament. In it he upbraids the Jews, foretelling the coming of Jesus Christ and His Forerunner, and also the Last Judgment (Mal 3:1-5; 4:1-6).

Saint Seiriol the Righteous of Wales, Abbott of Penmon Priory, brother of King Cynlas of Rhos and King Einion of Llŷn (6th century) - January 2 & February 1



Saint Seiriol the Righteous of Wales, Abbott of Penmon Priory, 

brother of King Cynlas of Rhos and King Einion of Llŷn (6th century) 

January 2 & February 1

Seiriol was an early 6th-century saint, who created a cell at Penmon Priory on Anglesey, off the coast of north Wales. He later moved to Ynys Seiriol (Puffin Island). He was a son of King Owain Danwyn of Rhos.

Sant Seiriol and Saint Cybi were good friends, and would meet weekly near Llanerchymedd, at the Clorach wells. Saint Cybi would walk from Holyhead, facing the rising sun in the morning and setting sun in the evening. Saint Cybi was known as Cybi Felyn (Cybi the Tanned), as he was tanned during his journey. Seiriol, travelling in the opposite direction, from Penmon, would have his back to the sun. Thus, he was known as Seiriol Wyn (Seiriol the Fair). Rhyd-y-Saint railway station (English: Ford of the Saints railway station) on the Red Wharf Bay branch line near Pentraeth, was named so as Seiriol and Cybi are said to have met there.

Seiriol was a younger brother of King Cynlas of Rhos and King Einion of Llŷn. His cell at Penmon is said to have been rebuilt by his brothers, as they didn't think his humble residence was good enough. St Seiriol's Well (Ffynnon Seiriol) lies in a small chamber adjoining its remains. Both are protected by Cadw, the publicly funded body responsible for the historic monuments of Wales. Adjacent to them are the church and ruins of a monastery also dating back to Seiriol's day.

In his old age, Seiriol retired to Ynys Lannog which subsequently became known (in Welsh) as Ynys Seiriol. Later it would be known to the Vikings as Priestholm, and is known as Puffin Island in English since the 19th century.

Saint Seiriol is commemorated 1 February and January 2.

Source: Wikiwand

Saint Basil the Great, Archbishop of Cæsarea in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (+379) - January 1


COMING HOME - ORTHODOXY



Saint Basil the Great, 

Archbishop of Cæsarea in Cappadocia, Asia Minor (+379)

January 1

Source: 


ORTHODOX CHURCH IN AMERICA

Saint Basil the Great, Archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia, “belongs not to the Church of Caesarea alone, nor merely to his own time, nor was he of benefit only to his own kinsmen, but rather to all lands and cities worldwide, and to all people he brought and still brings benefit, and for Christians he always was and will be a most salvific teacher.” Thus spoke St Basil’s contemporary, St Amphilochius, Bishop of Iconium.

St Basil was born in the year 330 at Caesarea, the administrative center of Cappadocia. He was of illustrious lineage, famed for its eminence and wealth, and zealous for the Christian Faith. The saint’s grandfather and grandmother on his father’s side had to hide in the forests of Pontus for seven years during the persecution under Diocletian.

St Basil’s mother St Emilia was the daughter of a martyr. On the Greek calendar, she is commemorated on May 30. St Basil’s father was also named Basil. He was a lawyer and renowned rhetorician, and lived at Caesarea.

Ten children were born to the elder Basil and Emilia: five sons and five daughters. Five of them were later numbered among the saints: Basil the Great; Macrina (July 19) was an exemplar of ascetic life, and exerted strong influence on the life and character of St Basil the Great; Gregory, afterwards Bishop of Nyssa (January 10); Peter, Bishop of Sebaste (January 9); and Theosebia, a deaconess (January 10).

St Basil spent the first years of his life on an estate belonging to his parents at the River Iris, where he